The Ghost Train of Dealey Plaza: Part II

The Ghost Train of Dealey Plaza: Part II

The Ghost Train of Dealey Plaza: Part II–  Further evidence concerning the Ghost Train

Altgens 7 is one of the indications of fraud in the Lone Gunman Story.

Altgens photos 5, 6, and 7 are linked in that they tell a story of the assassination, a crooked story. This series of photos along with the Zapruder film and Mary Moorman’s Polaroid are the key visual records in the public framing of Lee Oswald in the early days after the assassination.

Altgens 7 is one of the stories that were approved by the assassins to begin the cover-up of the assassination directly after President Kennedy’s murder. All of the media mentioned here are fraudulent.

Altgens 7 is the sad aftermath of the murder in Dealey Plaza showing the presidential limousine on the way to Parkland Hospital. Altgens 7 is part of the cover-up. Below is the photo in question:

This photo is generally cropped to just a view of the limousine and one was only shown the photo this way early on. You will see why as we go along. Altgens 7 shows the presidential limousine with Mrs. Kennedy still on the trunk of the car and Secret Service agent Clint Hill reaching towards her. The lead car is about to go under the Triple Underpass. Visible on the underpass are 11 men. These men have been identified and have given testimony to what they saw.

There is no train on the railroad bridge. You can see about 120 feet across the railroad bridge to the west banister.

Simple enough, isn’t it? Not really, there have been things added to this picture and things subtracted from it which change the whole story viewed here.

Walt Brown in his 1995 book Treachery in Dallas in the photo section midway through the book makes a comment that tells you what type of photo Altgens 7 really is. Briefly, it’s about Dallas Police Chief Jesse Curry’s car, its occupants, and its location. It is about the occupants of the car testifying that they heard the first shot when they reached the underpass.

In the Altgens 7 photo they are just coming to the underpass and Clint Hill is on the trunk of the presidential limousine which tells us that the assassination is over. If the assassination was over then how could Chief Curry be hearing shots? This thought by Walt Brown leads to other questions.

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Saintly Oswald, of youtube video fame, states that Motorcycle Officer Chaney should be in the photo. Chaney’s testimony states that he left his position by the limousine and caught up to the Chief Curry lead vehicle and made a statement to him. Therefore, he should be in the photo. Saintly Oswald suggests he has been painted out of the photo in the dark section under the bridge.

Of the 11 men on the railroad bridge I can see one who really resembles a Dallas policeman. He is wearing a white policemen’s hat. This is Officer J. W. Foster. Officer Foster is visible in other photos and can be identified by this white hat and uniform.

Officer Foster is on the left, picture left, of the pictured men on the railroad bridge behind the last man on the left. There is a man there with a white hat. It appears to be a policeman’s hat. There is a shiny spot on his chest suggesting a badge.

He is the figure that is elevated about 2 feet above the person standing in front of him. He either very tall perhaps, 7 or 8 feet tall, or he appears to standing on air. What would he be standing on there? There is no structure there to stand on in that spot.

Notice that in Altgens 7 you can see to the other banister or west banister of the Triple Underpass. Can you really do that from this position? Observe how wide and elevated the railroad bridge really is.

There are seven sets of tracks there. Given that the average tracks are about 13 ft to 15 ft wide, according to the internet, including ties you can see that the railroad bridge is wide, more than 100 feet wide, possibly more than 120 ft. The railroad bridge is wide and elevated above Elm Street. It is physically impossible to see from Altgens position the west banister on the west side of the underpass. Can you spell fraud?

If that is not enough to convince you look at the following and see if you can see the west banister.

This photo is slightly further back from where Altgens was. It gives a higher elevation than Altgens. You see more with a higher elevation than Altgens. Do you see the banister? Where did Altgens get the elevation to see to the other side of the railroad bridge? Was it from the Mark Bell film? Or, was that added through alteration?

The Testimony of J.W. Foster was taken at 1:30 a.m., on April 9, 1964, in the office of the U.S. attorney, 301 Post Office Building, Bryan and Ervay Streets, Dallas, Tex., by Mr. Joseph A. Ball, assistant counsel of the President’s Commission

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Officer J. W. Foster in his Warren Commission stated the following:

Mr. BALL – Did you have a special assignment on November 22?
Mr. FOSTER – Yes, sir.
Mr. BALL – 1963. And what was that?
Mr. FOSTER – That was assigned to the triple overpass to keep all unauthorized personnel off of it.
(off the record)
Mr. BALL – Tell me where you were standing on the triple overpass about the time that the President’s motorcade came into sight?
Mr. FOSTER – I was standing approximately along the – I believe the south curb of Elm Street.
Another cut and paste:

Mr. BALL – Were you on the overpass?
Mr. FOSTER – Yes, sir; at the east – be the east side of the overpass.
Mr. BALL – On the east side of the overpass?
Mr. FOSTER – Yes, sir.
Mr. BALL – Then was there another officer assigned to that same position?
Mr. FOSTER – He was assigned to the overpass with me; yes, sir.
Mr. BALL – What is his name?
Mr. FOSTER – J.C. White.
Mr. BALL – Where was he?
Mr. FOSTER – He was on the west side of the overpass.
Mr. BALL – You were on the east side?

Another cut and paste:

Mr. BALL – Now where were you standing?
Mr. FOSTER – Standing along the east curb of – east side of the overpass over Elm Street there, above the south curb.
Mr. BALL – Over, above the south curb of Elm?
Mr. FOSTER – Yes, sir.

These statements from Patrolman J. W. Foster clearly place him in the location of the other men on the railroad bridge as the presidential vehicle passed under it as shown in Altgens 7.

Another cut and paste:

Mr. BALL – Now, you had instructions to keep all unauthorized personnel off of that overpass?
Mr. FOSTER – Yes, sir.
Mr. BALL – Did you do that?
Mr. FOSTER – Yes, sir.
Mr. BALL – Did you permit some people to be there?
Mr. FOSTER – Yes, sir.
Mr. BALL – Who?
Mr. FOSTER – People that were working for the railroad there.
Mr. BALL – Were there many people?
Mr. FOSTER – About 10 or 11.
Mr. BALL – Where were they standing?
Mr. FOSTER – They were standing along the east banister.
Mr. BALL – The east banister?
Mr. FOSTER – Yes, sir; in front of me.
Mr. BALL – In front of you. Will you mark there and show the general area where they were standing?
Mr. FOSTER – They were standing along this area here [indicating].
Mr. BALL – You have marked a series of X’s to show where about 10 people were standing?

I do not believe Officer J. W. Foster would have allowed anyone to be standing over Elm St. where they could easily have dropped something on President Kennedy’s head as he passed by going under the railroad bridge. Policemen are suspicious of others by nature and training. The risk is too great that even someone could spit on or throw something at President Kennedy as he passed by.

1. This photo is a composite picture. The background scene was taken after the presidential party and others had left Dealey Plaza. Railroad workers who were kept off the bridge were not allowed on it until after Officer J. W. Foster left the scene for the area of TSBD. He is an insertion behind the railroad workers. And, I believe elevated to be noticeable.
2. J. W. Fosters’ WC testimony appears to be changed in regards to his location with this statement “I was standing approximately along the – I believe the south curb of Elm Street.”
3. I believe Officer Foster and the railroad workers were standing on the railroad bridge north of the Elm St. curb near the area where the grass joins the railroad bridge at the top of the embankment. There is evidence for this. Their view of the assassination would be about the same as being above Elm St. And, no one was on the railroad bridge over Elm Street except Officer J. C. White. There are many photos and film frames that show this.
Continuing with the theme something missing and something added is the most glaring thing about this photo, Altgens 7. That is the missing passenger / freight train, the Ghost Train of Dealey Plaza.

The west side of the Triple Underpass was covered by Dallas Police Officer J. C. White. Officer White had the same mission as Officer Foster. That is to keep unauthorized personnel off the railroad bridge.

The testimony of J.C. White was taken at 11:45 a.m., on April 9, 1964; In the office of the U.S. attorney, 801 Post Office Building, Bryan and Ervay Streets, Dallas, Tex., by Mr. Joseph A. Ball, assistant counsel of the President’s Commission.

From J. C. White’s Warren Commission testimony:

Mr. BALL. Now, on November22. 1963, did you have an assignment?
Mr. WHITE. Yes, sir.
Mr. BALL. Where?
Mr. WHITE. On the triple underpass.
Mr. BALL. And were you there with someone?
Mr. WHITE. Yes, sir.
Mr. BALL. Who?
Mr. WHITE. J. W. Foster.
Mr. BALL. Where were you?
Mr. WHITE. Standing on the west side of the overpass.
Mr. BALL. On the west side of the overpass?
Mr. WHITE. Yes.
Mr. BALL. Where were you with reference to Elm. Main or Commerce as they go underneath the overpass?
Mr. WHITE. Approximately at the north curb of Main Street.

This firmly established Officer Whites’ location. Basically, this can be established by the McIntyre photo showing him above the south curb of Main Street. The McIntyre does not show a train on the railroad bridge.
And this cut and paste gives us what he saw:

Mr. BALL. Did you see the President’s car come into sight?
Mr. WHITE. No, sir; first time I saw it it has passed, passed under the triple underpass.
Mr. BALL. You were too far away to see it, were you?
Mr. WHITE. There was a freight train traveling. There was a train passing between the location I was standing and the area from which the procession was traveling, and-a big long freight train, and I did not see it.
Mr. BALL. You didn’t see the procession?
Mr. WHITE. No, sir.
Mr. BALL. Before the train went by, did you see some railroad personnel over on the-would it be the–
Mr. WHITE. East side?
Mr. BALL. East side of the overpass?
Mr. WHITE. Yes, sir.
Mr. BALL. How many people?
Mr. WHITE. About 10, approximately. I didn’t count them.
Mr. BALL. Did you hear any shots?
Mr. WHITE. No, sir.

From his testimony Officer White essentially saw and heard nothing, particularly firecrackers or shots, concerning the assassination. This is because a big, long, slow freight train was going by. Actually, it was part passenger train and freight train. If you have ever stood close to a freight train you know that you don’t hear anything but, freight train.

The question arises did he hear nothing? Others near the railroad bridge heard firecrackers. To hear firecrackers the train must have briefly stopped.
This article is rather long and needs to be broken into parts. Part II will continue this discussion and Part III will offer visual evidence of the Ghost Train of Dealey Plaza.

Many people said they heard firecrackers near the Triple Underpass? If they did the train had stopped and would provide a wonderful shooting platform down Main and Elm Streets.

James Tague was standing in the area of the railroad bridge near Main St. He said he heard a firecracker sound. This is not different from many other witnesses who heard firecracker sounds. There is no train shown on the Triple Underpass in this photo. James Tague is the tiny, indistinct figure standing by the railroad bridge at the Commerce / Main Street division.

But, one wonders how he heard that low sound from up near the TSBD when a “big long freight train” was going by. Officer J. C. White did not. Could it be that the “ghost train” stopped briefly? Did it stop there long enough for someone to fire shots into the plaza?

Which makes you wonder? How did Officer Foster and his railroad crew hear firecrackers or shots from up at the TSBD and Elm St.? This is what Foster said:

Mr. FOSTER – After he came onto Elm I watched the men on the track more than I was him. Then I heard this loud noise, sound like a large firecracker. Kind of dumbfounded at first and then heard the second one. I moved to the banister of the overpass to see what was happening. Then the third explosion, and they were beginning to move around. I ran after I saw what was happening.

This implies a sequence of shots with roughly the same time interval. His testimony implies these shots were fired in the intersection of Elm and Houston. A question arises on how Foster moved to the banister if he was already there as seen in Altgens 7.

Mark Lane interviewed a number of these men who were supposedly on the railroad bridge over Elm St. S. M. Holland and others said pretty much the same thing on what they saw and heard. This interview by Mark Lane of S. M. Holland is what raised a suspicious flag for me when I first saw it.
He also heard firecracker sounds. Holland’s statements were delivered in such a manner as to suggest lying. I watched the interview several times and still came away with that impression. S. M. Holland was acting like a middle school kid caught lying by the teacher. Mark Lane was pleased as punch, as the old saying goes, to have a witness to more shooting and conspiracy. Did he even care if it was truthful?

They, the railroad workers, particularly S. M. Holland, identified their location as shown in Altgens 7. End of the story? Not really, because they were not where they said they were. They lied. And, a good question is why?

DPD Officer Earle Brown’s WC testimony will be helpful in this regard and shed further light on this situation.

The testimony of Earle V. Brown was taken at 4:40 p.m., on April 7, 1964. in the office of the U.S. attorney, 801 Post Office Building, Bryan and Ervay Street, Dallas, Tex., by Messrs. Joseph A. Ball and Samuel A. Stern, assistant counsel of the President’s Commission.

Earle Brown testimony: (this is somewhat confusing)

Mr. BALL. On November , 1964, were you assigned to a certain post on duty?
Mr. BROWN. Yes, sir.
Mr. BALL. Where?
Mr. BROWN. That would be the railroad overpass over Stemmons Expressway service road.
….
Mr. BROWN. It’s over Stemmons Expressway; in other words, they make that turn of Elm and go up.
This photo will help understand the Earle Brown testimony.

Mr. BALL. How far were you from the place where the continuation of Elm goes under the overpass?
Mr. BROWN. Oh, approximately 100 yards.
Mr. BALL. Let me see if we can get something In the record that will be your position. You were appointed to this particular spot?
Mr. BROWN. Yes, sir.
Mr. BALL. Was there another patrolman on the overpass also?
Mr. BROWN. Yes, sir; James Lomax.
Another cut and paste:

Mr. BALL. Did you people keep people off the overpass?
Mr. BROWN. We made no contact with anyone except one of the railroad detectives come up there and talked to us.

Another cut and paste:

Mr. BALL. Did you have the railroad yards In sight?
Mr. BROWN. Yes, sir.
Mr. BALL. They would he what direction from where you were standing?
Mr. BROWN. That would he east; that would he east of us.
Mr. BALL. East, maybe a little north?
Mr. BROWN. Yes, the whole thing kind of in that general direction, you know.
Mr. BALL. Did you see any people over In the railroad yards?
Mr. BROWN. Not that I recall; now they were moving trains in and out.
Mr. BALL. But you did not see people standing?
Mr. BROWN. No, sir; sure didn’t.
Mr. BALL. Everything was in clear view?
Mr. BROWN. Yes, sir.
Mr. BALL. I withdraw the question. Was there any obstruction of your vision to the railroad yards?

(This doesn’t pertain to the Ghost Train but is interesting and informative.)

Mr. BROWN. Now they came down Main, didn’t they, to Houston?
Mr. BALL. Yes.
Mr. BROWN. No. sir; actually, the first I noticed the car was when it stopped.
Mr. BALL. Where?
Mr. BROWN. After it made the turn and when the shots were fired, it stopped.
Mr. BALL. Did It come to a. complete stop?
Mr. BROWN. That, I couldn’t swear to.
Mr. BALL. It appeared to be slowed down some?
Mr. BROWN. Yes; slowed down.
Mr. BALL. Did you hear the shots?
Mr. BROWN. Yes, sir.
Mr. BALL. How many?
Mr. BROWN. Three.
Mr. BROWN. You know, actually off to the – between us and the, this over pass you are

Another cut and paste:

Mr. BALL. Was there anybody standing on the triple underpass at the point where Elm goes underneath?
Mr. BROWN. Uh-uh, I couldn’t recall; no one except police officers.
Mr. BALL. More than one?
Mr. BROWN. Yes.

What comes through from Brown’s testimony is that there were only police officers on the Triple Underpass and no railroad workers. Thus, the testimony of two police officers and eventually Foster’s changed testimony gives the lie to Altgens photo 7.